slack


slack
I. slack slack 2 also slack off verb [intransitive]
to make less of an effort than usual or be lazy in your work:

• He was accused of slacking and taking too many holidays.

  [m0] II. slack slack 3 noun [uncountable]
money, space, or people that an organization is not using at present, but could use in the future:

• There is very little slack in the training budget for this year.

  [m0] III. slack slack 1 [slæk] adjective
1. COMMERCE a slack period of time is one with less business activity than usual:

• Business is slack just now.

• The workers feared being laid off (= losing their jobs ) in slack periods.

2. if someone is being slack, they are not taking enough care or making enough effort to do things right:

• The report criticized airport security as “disgracefully slack”.

• High prices and the absence of competition may make firms slack in their use of resources.

— slackness noun [uncountable] :

• the slackness of the London market at present

• The report accuses the government of slackness.

* * *

Ⅰ.
slack UK US /slæk/ adjective
if business or economic activity is slack, there is less activity than usual: »

He wanted to sell some of his rental homes, but the region's slack economy stopped him.

»

May was a very slack month for the entire industry.

»

slack market/demand/sales

slack time/period »

Summer is usually a slack time for energy demand.

something that is slack is not strict or effective enough: »

Experts say that slacker financial controls may be to blame.

»

There were claims in the media of slack corporate governance.

someone who is slack is not working hard enough or spending enough time or care on something: »

Businesses that shout loudest about delayed payments are often the worst slack payers.

be slack with something »

She's always been a bit slack with her accounts.

Ⅱ.
slack UK US /slæk/ noun [U]
resources, such as money, people, or time, that are not being used at a particular time: »

At the moment we have very little slack for dealing with emergencies.

slack in something »

Anne and Bill didn't have enough slack in their household budget.

pick/take up slack — Cf. take up slack
slackness noun [U]
»

There has been some slackness in the labor market this quarter.


Financial and business terms. 2012.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Slack — ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Andrew Slack (* 1955), australischer Rugbyspieler Charles E. Slack, US amerikanischer Basketballspieler Charles Roger Slack (* 1937), britischer Biochemiker und Pflanzenphysiologe Freddie Slack (1910–1965) …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Slack — Slack, a. [Compar. {Slacker}; superl. {Slackest}.] [OE. slak, AS. sleac; akin to OS. slak, OHG. slah, Prov. G. schlack, Icel. slakr, Sw. slak; cf. Skr. s[.r]j to let loose, to throw. Cf. {Slake}.] Lax; not tense; not hard drawn; not firmly… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • slack — slack1 [slak] adj. [ME slakke < OE slæc, akin to Du slak < IE base * (s)lēg , loose, slack > L laxus, lax] 1. slow; idle; sluggish 2. barely moving: said of a current, as of air or water 3. characterized by little work, trade, or… …   English World dictionary

  • Slack — Slack, Slacken Slack en, v. t. 1. To render slack; to make less tense or firm; as, to slack a rope; to slacken a bandage. Wycklif (Acts xxvii. 40) [1913 Webster] 2. To neglect; to be remiss in. [Obs.] Shak. [1913 Webster] Slack not the pressage.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Slack — may refer to: *John Bamford Slack, British politician and lay preacher *William Yarnel Slack, Confederate general killed in the American Civil War *Slack (project management), a term used in project management *Slack, West Yorkshire, a village in …   Wikipedia

  • Slack — [slɛk , engl.: slæk], der; s [engl. slack = Flaute, zu: slack = locker, lose, flau] (Wirtsch.): Überschuss an [finanziellen] Mitteln eines Unternehmens, der sich in Erfolgszeiten ansammelt u. als Reserve für Krisenzeiten dient. * * * Slack  … …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Slack — Slack, Slacken Slack en, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Slacked}, {Slackened}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Slacking}, {Slackening}.] [See {Slack}, a.] 1. To become slack; to be made less tense, firm, or rigid; to decrease in tension; as, a wet cord slackens in dry… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • slack — Ⅰ. slack [1] ► ADJECTIVE 1) not taut or held tightly in position; loose. 2) (of business or trade) not busy; quiet. 3) careless, lazy, or negligent. 4) (of a tide) neither ebbing nor flowing. ► NOUN 1) …   English terms dictionary

  • slack — [adj1] loose, baggy; inactive dull, easy, feeble, flabby, flaccid, flexible, flimsy, inert, infirm, laggard, lax, leisurely, limp, not taut, passive, quaggy, quiet, relaxed, sloppy, slow, slow moving, sluggish, soft, supine, unsteady, weak;… …   New thesaurus

  • Slack — Slack, adv. Slackly; as, slack dried hops. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Slack — Slack, n. The part of anything that hangs loose, having no strain upon it; as, the slack of a rope or of a sail. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English